American women pursue Saudi dads of their children

American women pursue Saudi dads of their children

December 08, 2015
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Saudi Gazette report

Saudi Gazette report

RIYADH — An American website titled “Saudi Children Left Behind” has been launched to help American women find Saudi men who have impregnated them and abandoned them and their children, Al-Hayat reported.

A source said the website was launched after a growing phenomenon of Saudi university students impregnating American women and leaving the children behind.

“American mothers of Saudi children began posting their personal stories on the website with pictures and names of the Saudi fathers. The mothers have tried to contact the fathers several times but to no avail. They were left with no other choice but to launch the website in the hope of reaching out to someone who might know the fathers,” said the source.

The source said Saudis fathering children with American women started as a trend in the 80s.

“The phenomenon calmed down during the 90s but has recently risen. Many Saudi men bailed out of the relationships they had with American women once they found out the women were pregnant. The website has data in Arabic and English and is visited by over 1.5 million viewers,” said the source.

The source also said the mothers also posted they have contacted Awasir, a charity organization for Saudi families abroad, seeking help but experienced prolonged delays.

Umm Sami, a 27-year-old American got into a relationship with a Saudi student.

“I converted to Islam for him and became pregnant with a boy. Sami’s father abruptly left me when I was 7-month pregnant. Sami is three years old now and he will ask me one day about his father. I am not after money or attention. I just want Sami’s father to sign official papers so my son can be considered a citizen of Guatemala,” she said.

She added she is forced to pay taxes for her son because he is not considered a citizen.

“I tried contacting Awasir two years ago but until now no progress has been done. I tried my best and I have no regrets. When my son asks me about his dad in the future I will tell him I tried my best,” said Umm Sami.

Awasir president Tawfiq Al-Suwailim said the number of intermarriage divorces has risen to 50 percent during the past 10 years.

“Difference in cultures and traditions takes its toll in marriages across cultures. Divorces happen everywhere and children are always the victim of the divorce. We regard the children of Saudis as our responsibility. We are open to help them and provide for them as much as possible,” said Al-Suwailim.

He also said the rate of unarranged marriages is decreasing and the organization is working on raising awareness among Saudi students of the consequences of being involved in an unlawful relationship or marrying a foreign woman.


December 08, 2015
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