Making up for lost time

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Okaz

AS it is customary for decades, we honor people by naming streets, halls or edifices after them when they die and are no longer among us. We give medals only to people when they become extremely old and feeble.

What really prevents us from naming streets, halls or monuments after our great men and women during their life time and when they are strong and capable?.

Why don't we grant our great personalities the decorations and merit certificates when they are very much alive, strong and at their prime time?

Because of their old age and bad health, these people are often not able to climb the platforms where the medals and decorations are distributed.

If they are decorated at an early age, they will climb the platforms with all their vitality and exuberance of happiness and the spirit of gratefulness instead of dragging their legs slowly due to their old age or on wheel chairs.

When these people are honored after they become old and sick, the pains of sickness and disability will erode their joy and mar their pleasure of being recognized.

The minister of culture has announced that a cinema house has been named after the late female painter Munira Musalli, may Allah have mercy on her soul.

There were a lot of great men and women whom streets were named after when they were no longer among us or that they were decorated only when they became too old.

At the recently-concluded Janadriyah Festival, the decoration ceremony was marked by a display of old people on wheel chairs.

Why do we remember our great men and women only after they die or are on the verge of death? Was it an afterthought driven by the awakening of the conscience for not honoring them when they were young and strong?

However, when the consciences are awakened, they correct their steps and do not repeat their mistakes.

Please honor our great men and women at their prime time when they are alive and strong before they are carried away by death, old age or bad health.


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