UN claims Syria regime planning an 'apocalypse'

Damascus intensifies Ghouta assault in bid to cut rebel enclave in half

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GENEVA/BEIRUT — Syrian regime's is orchestrating an "apocalypse" that will strike elsewhere following the devastating crisis unfolding in the rebel-held enclave of Eastern Ghouta, the UN human rights chief said Wednesday. In his annual report to the United Nations Human Rights Council, Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein said the government's actions in the area were "legally and morally unsustainable", while warning the next nightmare for Syrian civilians would inevitably arrive soon.

"This month, it is Eastern Ghouta which is, in the words of the secretary general, hell on earth; next month or the month after, it will be somewhere else where people face an apocalypse — an apocalypse intended, planned and executed by individuals within the government, apparently with the full backing of some of their foreign supporters," Zeid told the council.

"It is urgent to reverse this catastrophic course, and to refer Syria to the International Criminal Court," he added.

The Syrian army and allied militia launched an offensive on February 18 to retake eastern Ghouta, the last rebel-controlled region near the capital Damascus.

The offensive has been backed by Russia, the government's key military ally.

They have since recaptured more than 40 percent of the area with support from a devastating bombing campaign that has killed more than 800 civilians.

By Wednesday, government troops were at the edges of several key towns, including Misraba, Beit Sawa, Jisreen and Hammuriyeh.

Beyond Eastern Ghouta, Zeid said the seven-year-old conflict in Syria was entering "a new phase of horror", noting rising violence in the rebel-held area of Idlib and Turkey's offensive in Afrin.

"When you are prepared to kill your own people so easily, lying is easy too. Claims by the government of Syria that it is taking every measure to protect its civilian population are frankly ridiculous," Zeid said.

Meanwhile, Syrian government forces pounded a town in the eastern Ghouta with airstrikes in an effort to slice the rebel enclave in two as they intensified a campaign to deal the opposition its biggest defeat since 2016.

The Syrian government assault of the densely populated area on the outskirts of Damascus, which began more than two weeks ago, has become one of the fiercest campaigns of the war now entering its eighth year. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights monitoring group says 800 civilians have been killed by government bombing and shelling.

Live footage broadcast by Syrian state TV from the outskirts of the town of Mesraba showed enormous clouds of smoke rising into the sky. The sounds of explosions and jets could be heard.

A state TV correspondent said militant defenses in the town were being struck by "preparatory fire" in advance of a planned infantry assault.

Capturing Mesraba would divide the eastern Ghouta in two after days of a ground offensive that the observatory says has already seen government forces capture nearly half of the territory. The observatory said an extra 700 pro-government militia fighters had arrived at the front as reinforcements.

In Douma, eastern Ghouta's biggest town where civilians from other parts of the area have sought shelter, the sound of frontline battles could be heard, a witness there told Reuters.

The United Nations says 400,000 people are trapped in the towns and villages of the eastern Ghouta, under government siege for years and already running out of food and medicine before the assault. An aid convoy reached the area this week but government officials had stripped out most medical supplies.

Russia, President Bashar Al-Assad's most powerful ally, has offered rebel fighters safe passage out with their families and personal weapons. The proposal echoes previous agreements under which insurgents, in the face of military defeat, were permitted to withdraw to opposition-held areas at the Turkish border.

The UN Security Council has called for a 30-day countrywide ceasefire, but Moscow and Damascus have not halted the campaign, arguing that the fighters they are striking are members of banned terrorist groups unprotected by the truce.

Russia's defense ministry said on Wednesday some rebels wanted to accept the proposal to evacuate. So far rebels have dismissed it in public. The military spokesman for one of the main eastern Ghouta rebel groups said rebels would defend the territory and there were no negotiations over a withdrawal. — Agencies


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