Why do government departments sabotage each other’s projects?

We are used to cases of city or regional municipalities removing individuals or groups of people who have encroached on government land.

 

 

Saeed Al-Suraihi

Okaz Newspaper

 

 

 

 

We are used to cases of city or regional municipalities removing individuals or groups of people who have encroached on government land.

 

 However, there has been a recent occasion in which one government body moved its vehicles and security guards in to remove what it considered an encroachment on its land by a local municipality. The case was described by one of the parties as irresponsible and could also be described as unbelievable.

 

All government departments stress that going to court is the only way to settle disputes and restore rights. However, what took place in Buraidah, Qassim, between the municipality and the region’s Department of Education is evidence that some officials believe they are able to restore their rights by force and that they can assume the role of prosecutor, court and executive body. 

 

The municipality says that the land, on which it planned to construct a women-only park, belongs to it as per previous government decisions. If that is true, then the Department of Education’s action is outrageous.

 

However, it the Department of Education’s claim is true, then the municipality has demonstrated that it is not hesitant to perpetrate exactly what it prohibits citizens from doing, which is building on land that does not belong to it. 

 

The quarrel in Qassim is an example of what occurs when there is a conflict in the projects that are being executed by different departments. Such conflicts can lead to one adversary sabotaging another departments’s project.

 

Another example is when municipalities pave streets only for water and electricity companies to dig them up the very next day. Projects that stop halfway are evidence of conflicts and disputes between different parties and departments.